All data and information provided on this site is for informational purposes only. DAARAC.org makes no representations as to accuracy, completeness, currentness, suitability, or validity of any information on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.
Search DAARAC.org

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Night of the Living Dead (1968)
























Starring:
  • Duane Jones
  • Judith O'Dea
  • Karl Hardman
IMDB.com
Barbra and her brother Johnny travel by car from Pittsburgh to the countryside to visit the gravestone of their father in the cemetery. Out of the blue, they are attacked by a strange man and Johnny is murdered. Barbra runs and releases the brake of Johnny's car since the keys are in his pocket, and flees to an isolated farmhouse, where she locks herself inside. Barbra is in shock and soon she finds a man, Ben, who is also escaping from the inhuman creatures and he reinforces the doors, windows and openings in the house. He also finds a shotgun and a radio and they learn that the radiation from a satellite that was returning from Venus has somehow reactivated the brain of the dead. Then they find five humans hidden in the basement: Harry Cooper, his wife Helen and their daughter Karen that is sick; and Tom and his girlfriend Judy. Harry has an argument with Ben, since he believes that the basement is the safest place for them and Harry goes not agree. Along the night, the tension ...

Blackhorrormovies.com
The movie that changed zombie lore forever, NOTLD is a classic not only of horror in general, but of black horror in particular. Supposedly, the racial commentary that can be read into the film was never intended, as the role of Ben wasn't written for a black man. Still, the fact that George Romero picked Duane Jones for the lead role is racially significant in and of itself, particularly since he gets to smack around some white people. I imagine that there were quite a few black people in 1968 who would've done that for free. Jones' presence is commanding and perfect for the character of Ben, who doesn't hesitate to take charge of the group hiding from the zombie horde. Though he meets resistence, race is never a spoken issue. Still, you can't help but read into the fact that while Ben survives through the night, he's unceremoniously shot the next day by a bunch of zombie-hunting rednecks. Though low-budget, NOTLD is well-acted, well-paced, and still impressive to this day, making you wonder why so many of the monetarily challenged zombie movies made today are such utter crap.

Friday, September 13, 2013

Underworld (1937)























Starring:


Storyline
Paul Bronson lusts after the decadent world of nightclubs and casinos. His strongest desires are reserved for the dangerously voluptuous Dinah Jackson, but this beautiful temptress is really the "property" of mob boss LeRoy Giles. When jealous LeRoy gets wind of Dinah's cheating, he cuts off her money and kicks her out. An angry Dinah has LeRoy shot, and suspicion falls on Paul. Dinah is Paul's only alibi - and his only hope of avoiding a long walk down death row.

Africa Speaks! (1930)






















Starring:
  • Harald Austin
  • Paul L. Hoefler
  • Lowell Thomas

IMDB.com

Hear the hoof-beats of the gnus and see a young boy chased down and killed by a lion (sans the screams)was what "Africa Speaks!" promised, and delivered. Filmed on the Colorado African Expedition of 1928, headed by Paul L. Hoefler, this film rose above the 'jungle-graph' films of the past---"Chang" excepted---because of the sound and not the views of the Dark Continent offered, albeit most of these were new views that some of the critics debated over whether or not some of them were staged. It contained: a locust swarm that devoured everything but the expedition camera; a visit to the duck-billed pygmy tribe in which the females of the tribe had discs inserted beneath their lips when very young and, as they grow older, larger discs replace the previous discs; an antelope---called and spelled illampa in the film---that jumps forty feet backward or forward when frightened and some slow-motion shots are used. "Africa Speaks!" showed Africa to be both dangerous and noisy.

In order to bring this important early sound era documentary into proper cultural and natural historic focus, one must bethink of the prodigious changes that have altered the face of Africa as well as its humanity and fauna during the more than 70 years since the film's production. One can only imagine the reaction of a 1930 audience which viewed the extraordinary events presented and filmed by Colorado-based explorer Paul Hoefler, including the death and mealtaking by a family of lions of one of Hoefler's expeditionary native assistants, total decimation of the expedition's surrounding flora by a massive winged horde of locusts, and remarkable animals and people of many varieties. Narrator Lowell Thomas' somewhat casual comments of events that could not have been greeted in such cavalier fashion at the time they occurred can be offputting, and his attempts at whimsy consistently fall as flat as the veldt being traversed, but withal the narration provides a raft of historically fascinating data. Hoefler's book of the same title, published shortly after the release of the film, differs insofar as the expedition actually travelled from east to west, rather than the reverse, but for purposes of visual impact actual events were edited in order to produce dramatic action.

Visit Blaxploitation Jive for biographies on Legendary Artist and discography information.